The Daily Dish: Black Pepper Teriyaki Chicken and Pineapple Satay

Black Pepper Teriyaki Chicken and Pineapple Satays

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I used to make my own soy syrup, but it was very delicate and had a tendency to break like an aioli. But one day my Indonesian sous chef Budi introduced me to Kechap Manis, a great sweet soy syrup from his country. I said, “Wow, Budi, you just saved me a lot of steps!” And now I use Kechap Manis all the time as a base for glazes and sauces… like my Black Pepper-Teriyaki Chicken and Pineapple Satays, a terrific grilled appetizer you can serve any time you’re looking for tasty finger food.

Serves 4 as an appetizer

Ingredients
3 boneless, skinless chicken breasts, cut into 1-inch cubes
1 small pineapple, cut into 1-inch cubes
2/3 cup kechap manis
2 oranges, zested and juiced, minced zest for garnish
1 tablespoon minced ginger
1 tablespoon coarse ground black pepper
1 bunch scallions sliced thinly, separate white and green
Bamboo skewers, soaked in water for at least 1 hour
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
Cooking spray

Directions
Assemble satays by alternating chicken and pineapple. In a large bowl, combine kechap manis, orange juice, ginger, black pepper and scallion whites. Add satays and marinate for 15 minutes.

Prepare a hot grill, sprayed slick. Remove satays from marinade, reserving marinade. Grill satays until chicken is cooked through, about 3-4 minutes per side.

Meanwhile, boil marinade for a dipping sauce and use some of it to brush onto satays while cooking.

Serve in bamboo satay plate with dipping sauce garnished with scallion greens.

Garnish satays with orange zest and scallion greens.
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chef ming tsaiMing Tsai is the host and executive producer of public television series Simply Ming.

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The Daily Dish: Chinese Dumplings with Soy Dipping Sauce

chinese dumplings with soy dipping sauce

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My favorite appetizer of all time has to be Asian dumplings, sometimes called Peking ravioli. There are more than a few ingredients to making good dumplings, but they are worth the effort. If you are making a dozen, you might as well make 100 and freeze them—once you get everything together, the assembly is fun and I have found that the little hands of kids turn this into a fun project.

Preparation Time: 90 minutes
Start to Finish Time: 90 minutes
Yield: 3 dozen dumplings

Ingredients

4 leaves Napa cabbage, finely chopped
5 garlic chives, finely chopped (substitute scallions or chives)
2 tablespoons sesame oil
1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh ginger (1-inch piece)
1 pound ground pork
3/4 cup low-sodium soy sauce
3 tablespoons rice wine vinegar
1 teaspoon ground-garlic and chili sauce (such as Sriracha brand)
2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
8 cilantro leaves, roughly chopped
1 package round dumpling wrappers (substitute square wonton wrappers)
6 tablespoons peanut oil, divided

Directions
In a medium bowl, combine first 10 ingredients. With a dumpling wrapper flat in one hand, place about a tablespoon of filling in the middle in an oblong lump. There should be enough margin left along the wrapper to close it without spilling the filling, but don’t underfill.

Wet your finger and smear a little moisture along the outer edge of the wrapper; then fold the wrapper edges up into a taco shape and pinch the edges together at the top (in the middle) so that they’re stuck together (don’t let the pork filling get caught between). Create a pleat just to the right (or left) of the center pinch. Flatten the pleat next to the middle pinch point and squeeze the dough together.

Continue to the end of the dumpling; you should have two or three pleats from middle to end. At the end, you should have a small opening.

Pinch the end of the loop in toward the center of the dumpling and squeeze together.

Return to the middle pinch point and make pleats on the same side of the wrapper but in the opposite direction. At the end, pinch in the loop and squeeze the dough sealed.

Heat a large sauté pan to very high. Add about 2 tablespoons peanut oil.

Add up to 12 dumplings to the pan (don’t overcrowd) and brown well on both sides.

Add 1/4 cup water; then cover and let steam about 3 minutes. Add another 1/4 cup water; then cover and let steam about 3 minutes longer.

Remove to a plate and continue cooking remaining dumplings in batches. Serve with Soy Dipping Sauce.

Soy Dipping Sauce

Ingredients
• 1 cup light soy sauce
• 2 tablespoons rice wine vinegar
• 1 teaspoon sesame oil
• 1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger
• 1 scallion, finely sliced

Directions for Dipping Sauce
In a small bowl, combine all ingredients.

Serve with prepared dumplings.
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Annie B. Copps is a senior editor at Yankee Magazine. Annie oversees the magazine’s food coverage, both as an editor and as a contributor of feature stories and columns.

The Daily Dish: Parsley-Garlic Stuffed Shrimp in Yuzu-Dashi Dip

Parsley-Garlic Stuffed Shrimp in Yuzu-Dashi Dip
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If you asked the Japanese to name their most important cooking ingredient, they’d probably say ‘dashi,’ the briny stock they use as a foundation for so many dishes. And if you asked an American the same thing, the ubiquitous herb, parsley, would be right up there. So today I’m combining those two east-west workhorses to flavor a straightforward recipe that produces either an impressive appetizer or entrée…my Parsley-Garlic Stuffed Shrimp in Yuzu-Dashi Dip.

Serves 4

Ingredients
1 cup panko
5 cloves garlic
1 cup packed parsley leaves
3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, plus extra for drizzling
8 colossal shrimp, butterflied
2 cups dashi
2 tablespoon fresh yuzu juice
1 tablespoon naturally brewed soy sauce
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Directions
Turn on broiler and place heat-proof plates under broiler to pre-heat. In a mini food processor fitted with blade, buzz the panko, garlic and parsley with pinch of salt and drizzle in extra virgin olive oil. Pack the shrimp with the mixture.

Remove hot plates from broiler and drizzle extra virgin olive oil on plate. Top with shrimp and broil until done, about 6-8 minutes.

Meanwhile, in a small bowl combine dashi, yuzu and naturally brewed soy sauce; taste and season, if necessary. Serve broiled shrimp with side of dashi dipping sauce.

Drink pairings
Remy Pannier Sancerre
—Sancerre, Loire Valley, France

Taste: Fresh, dry fruit and well-balanced with a long finish.
Aroma: Grapefruit and gooseberries

—100% Sauvignon Blanc
—Serve chilled; Pairs well with seafood, shellfish and goat cheese.

__________________________________________________________
chef ming tsaiMing Tsai is the host and executive producer of public television series Simply Ming.

The Daily Dish: Asian Pistou Dumplings in Lime Broth

a bowl of asian pistou with lime

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Some of China’s smallest treasures are also its tastiest — dim sum — those savory little dumplings filled with meat, seafood, and vegetables. And they translate well to Western cuisine because they make great hors d’oeuvres. Today, however, we serve up a vegetarian soup version in my Asian Pistou Dumplings in Lime Broth. Let’s get cooking.

Yields 10 dumplings

Ingredients
1 bunch scallions, sliced thinly, white and green separated
4 cups vegetarian broth
Juice of 2 limes
1 tablespoon Wanjashan low-sodium tamari
1/2 cup packed parsley
1/2 cup packed Thai basil
4 cloves garlic
1/2 cup edamame
4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
10-12 thin wonton wrappers
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Directions
In a saucepot coated lightly with extra virgin olive oil, sweat the scallion whites and add broth. Reduce by 25%. Season and add lime juice and tamari. Meanwhile, using mortar and pestle, blend with a pinch of salt the parsley, basil, and garlic.

Fold in edamame and extra virgin olive oil and check for seasoning. Alternatively, using a food processor, pulse together salt, parsley, basil and garlic. Remove mixture to a bowl and fold in edamame and whisk in olive oil.

Make wontons with Asian pistou filling. Boil in broth and serve.

Garnish with scallions greens.

__________________________________________________________
chef ming tsai Ming Tsai is the host and executive producer of public television series Simply Ming. Each week, Simply Ming brings mouthwatering recipes inspired by the combination of East and West into homes across the country.

The Daily Dish: Deviled Eggs with Tuna and Black Olives

deviled eggs with black olives

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Do you know Oleana restaurant in Cambridge? Or Sofra in Watertown? My good friend Ana Sortun is the genius behind those excellent restaurants, and in her book Spice, she shares some of her secrets. One of my addictions are her Deviled Eggs with Tuna and Black Olives. I encourage you to serve these at your next party, be it a luncheon, a barbecue, or a fancy dinner. That is assuming you don’t eat them before your guests arrive.

Prep time: 20 mins
Cook: 10 mins
Ready in: 30 mins

Ingredients
1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
1 cup minced fresh tuna (about 6 ounces)
1 scallion, minced
1/2 cup minced celery
Tiny pinch curry
Salt and pepper
8 hard-boiled eggs, split in half lengthwise, with yolks and whites separated
1 cup thick mayonnaise, preferably homemade
1 tablespoon chopped parsley
8 black olives, pitted and finely chopped
1 plum tomato, finely chopped

Directions
Heat oil in a medium saucepan over high heat.

Add the tuna, scallion, celery, curry and salt and pepper.

Cook until the tuna is just opaque, about 3 minutes. Cool and drain well.

In a small mixing bowl, mash the egg yolks with a fork. Stir in the mayonnaise, tuna, and
parsley. Season with salt and pepper.

Season the egg whites with salt and pepper and fill their centers with heaping spoonfuls of the tuna egg filling. Top each with a black olive and tomato.

(From Ana Sortum, Spice)

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Annie B. Copps is a senior editor at Yankee Magazine. Annie oversees the magazine’s food coverage, both as an editor and as a contributor of feature stories and columns.

The Daily Dish: Easy Breadsticks

breadsticks

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I love throwing dinner parties. I am always trying to think of fun and tasty snacks to have as appetizers: not too fancy or fussy, things you can pick up with your hands, and something I can make myself. I was recently at a cocktail party where breadsticks were served — store-bought — and they were okay, but I figured they can’t be too hard to make and I can add any flavors I like.

Ingredients
Pizza dough (homemade or store bought)

Any toppings you prefer. (we suggest black and white sesame seeds, fennel and coriander seeds, poppy seeds, chile powder, finely grated Parmesan cheese, za’atar spice mix, or freshly ground black pepper)

About 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
Coarse salt

Directions
Heat oven to 400 degrees.

Line 1 or 2 baking sheets with parchment paper. Roll out your favorite pizza dough (store-bought or homemade) to about 1/3 inch thick.

Using a large knife or pizza cutter, cut the dough into 3/4-inch-wide strips.

Brush lightly with water and sprinkle with any mix of seeds, spices, and cheese. One by one lift the ends of the strip and twist. Arranged the twisted strips onto baking sheets.

Bake until nicely browned and crisp, about 15 minutes. Drizzle with extra virgin olive oil and sprinkle with coarse salt.

Let cool, then serve or store up to 1 day in an airtight container.

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Annie B. Copps is a senior editor at Yankee Magazine. Annie oversees the magazine’s food coverage, both as an editor and as a contributor of feature stories and columns.

The Daily Dish: Bloody Mary Scallop Ceviche

Bloody Mary Scallop Ceviche in martini glasses

If you’ve ever eaten at a Korean restaurant, you’ve probably tasted kochu jang, a chile bean paste that packs more flavor in its pinkie than most condiments.

Today I’m using it in my master pair with one of the West’s top sauces, Worcestershire, another flavor monster. Together, they’re a force to be reckoned with, as you’ll see in today’s recipe: My Bloody Mary Scallop Ceviche. It brings one of my top drinks and one of my favorite appetizers together.

It’s a nice red to go with your red, white, and blue Independence Day celebrations this weekend.

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Serves 4

Ingredients
2 cups V-8 or tomato juice
3 tablespoons kochu jang
2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
1/2 cup 1/4-inch-diced celery
1 shallot, minced
pinch celery salt
4 limes, 3 juiced, 1 reserved for garnish
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
1/2 pound fresh Bay scallops, foot removed, rinsed, drained (or use quartered sea scallops)

Directions
In a large bowl, combine V-8, kochu jang, Worcestershire sauce, celery, shallot, celery salt and lime juice. Check flavor and season, if necessary. Add scallops and stir to combine. Cover and place in fridge for 10 minutes. Serve in chilled martini glasses garnished with lime wedge.

__________________________________________________________
chef ming tsaiMing Tsai is the host and executive producer of public television series Simply Ming. Each week, Simply Ming brings mouthwatering recipes inspired by the combination of East and West into homes across the country.