The Daily Dish: Black Pepper Teriyaki Chicken and Pineapple Satay

Black Pepper Teriyaki Chicken and Pineapple Satays

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I used to make my own soy syrup, but it was very delicate and had a tendency to break like an aioli. But one day my Indonesian sous chef Budi introduced me to Kechap Manis, a great sweet soy syrup from his country. I said, “Wow, Budi, you just saved me a lot of steps!” And now I use Kechap Manis all the time as a base for glazes and sauces… like my Black Pepper-Teriyaki Chicken and Pineapple Satays, a terrific grilled appetizer you can serve any time you’re looking for tasty finger food.

Serves 4 as an appetizer

Ingredients
3 boneless, skinless chicken breasts, cut into 1-inch cubes
1 small pineapple, cut into 1-inch cubes
2/3 cup kechap manis
2 oranges, zested and juiced, minced zest for garnish
1 tablespoon minced ginger
1 tablespoon coarse ground black pepper
1 bunch scallions sliced thinly, separate white and green
Bamboo skewers, soaked in water for at least 1 hour
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
Cooking spray

Directions
Assemble satays by alternating chicken and pineapple. In a large bowl, combine kechap manis, orange juice, ginger, black pepper and scallion whites. Add satays and marinate for 15 minutes.

Prepare a hot grill, sprayed slick. Remove satays from marinade, reserving marinade. Grill satays until chicken is cooked through, about 3-4 minutes per side.

Meanwhile, boil marinade for a dipping sauce and use some of it to brush onto satays while cooking.

Serve in bamboo satay plate with dipping sauce garnished with scallion greens.

Garnish satays with orange zest and scallion greens.
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chef ming tsaiMing Tsai is the host and executive producer of public television series Simply Ming.

The Daily Dish: Coconut-Cranberry Chicken Curry

Coconut-Cranberry Chicken Curry

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What happens when you take coconut milk from the East and combine it cranberries from the west? Well, you get today’s dish: a quick Coconut-Cranberry Chicken Curry that introduces India to Cape Cod.

Ingredients

6-8 chicken thighs, skin on, bone in, seasoned for 10 minutes before cooking
2 red onions, sliced
2 sweet potatoes, peeled, 1/2-inch dice
1 tablespoon minced ginger
1 heaping tablespoon minced jalapeno
heaping 1/2 cup Craisins
2 tablespoon Madras curry powder
1 13.5 ounce can of coconut milk
1 cup water
Canola oil
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
Steamed Brown Rice

Directions
In a cast iron skillet or stockpot coated very lightly with oil on medium-high heat, sear the chicken, skin-side down, and completely render the fat.

Flip and brown meat-side. Remove chicken. Wipe out excess fat and saute the onions, potatoes, ginger, jalapeno, Craisins and curry powder and season. Add coconut milk and water, check for seasoning, then add chicken back. Bring to a simmer and cook chicken through, about 45 minutes. Serve family style on rice.

Beverage pairing
Jean-Luc Colombo La Violette Viognier From Pays d’Oc, Southern France. The aroma is intensely violet, which is where it gets its name, with nuances of licorice, lychee, apricot and peach. Well-structured, finishes with elegance and opulent fruit. 100% Viognier

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chef ming tsaiMing Tsai is the host and executive producer of public television series Simply Ming.

The Daily Dish: Baked Figs with Shaoxing Sabayon

baked figs

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One of the first things I had in France as a teenager was figs flambéed in orange liqueur. I realized that’s what they mean when they talk about “manna from heaven.” Since then I’ve combined figs with all kinds of spirits, but for one of the best, I reach to the East for Shaoxing wine.

This Chinese sherry-like wine is great for both sweet and savory cooking, and today we are going to take a trip on the sweet side with my Baked Figs with Shaoxing Sabayon, a warm dessert flavored with honey and candied ginger.

Serves 4

Ingredients
8 ripe, black mission figs, quartered
3 egg yolks
2 tablespoons Shaoxing wine
3 tablespoons honey
1 teaspoon minced candied ginger
1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice

Directions
Preheat broiler Place figs in oven-proof oval dishes. Over a bain marie, whisk yolks, Shaoxing wine, honey and ginger until thickened, taking care not to curdle eggs. Off the heat, whisk in lemon juice. Nap over figs and broil for about 1 minute, until lightly colored. Garnish with extra ginger and serve warm.

Ey Muscat de Rivesaltes
—Roussillon, France

Taste: Rich and velvety, with flavors of orange rind, lychee, peach and spice leading into a pleasantly bitter finish

Aroma: Aromatic and complex, recalling orange rind, fresh figs and apricot

This delicately sweet dessert wine is exceptional on its own or paired with fresh fruit desserts, pastries and custard. Lovely with the Baked Figs with Shaoxing Sabayon.

—100% Muscat d’Alexandrie

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chef ming tsaiMing Tsai is the host and executive producer of public television series Simply Ming.

The Daily Dish: Parsley-Garlic Stuffed Shrimp in Yuzu-Dashi Dip

Parsley-Garlic Stuffed Shrimp in Yuzu-Dashi Dip
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If you asked the Japanese to name their most important cooking ingredient, they’d probably say ‘dashi,’ the briny stock they use as a foundation for so many dishes. And if you asked an American the same thing, the ubiquitous herb, parsley, would be right up there. So today I’m combining those two east-west workhorses to flavor a straightforward recipe that produces either an impressive appetizer or entrée…my Parsley-Garlic Stuffed Shrimp in Yuzu-Dashi Dip.

Serves 4

Ingredients
1 cup panko
5 cloves garlic
1 cup packed parsley leaves
3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, plus extra for drizzling
8 colossal shrimp, butterflied
2 cups dashi
2 tablespoon fresh yuzu juice
1 tablespoon naturally brewed soy sauce
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Directions
Turn on broiler and place heat-proof plates under broiler to pre-heat. In a mini food processor fitted with blade, buzz the panko, garlic and parsley with pinch of salt and drizzle in extra virgin olive oil. Pack the shrimp with the mixture.

Remove hot plates from broiler and drizzle extra virgin olive oil on plate. Top with shrimp and broil until done, about 6-8 minutes.

Meanwhile, in a small bowl combine dashi, yuzu and naturally brewed soy sauce; taste and season, if necessary. Serve broiled shrimp with side of dashi dipping sauce.

Drink pairings
Remy Pannier Sancerre
—Sancerre, Loire Valley, France

Taste: Fresh, dry fruit and well-balanced with a long finish.
Aroma: Grapefruit and gooseberries

—100% Sauvignon Blanc
—Serve chilled; Pairs well with seafood, shellfish and goat cheese.

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chef ming tsaiMing Tsai is the host and executive producer of public television series Simply Ming.

The Daily Dish: Soba Noodle-Shrimp Pancakes

Soba Noodle-Shrimp Pancakes

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You may think that pasta is only as flavorful as its sauce, but that would mean you haven’t tried Japanese soba noodles. Made of buckwheat, they have an earthy, nutty flavor that evokes the countryside, which is why I’ve paired them with an Italian ingredient that has the same effect, pancetta. And this east-west pair is going to be the platform for today’s all in one dish: my Soba Noodle Shrimp Pancakes.

Serves 4

Ingredients
2 eggs
1 pound shrimp
1/4 cup chopped parsley, plus some leaves for garnish
2 tablespoons yuzu or fresh lemon juice
1 cup diced, rendered pancetta, cooled
2 cups blanched soba noodles (leave a pinhole of rawness in center)
Chopped parsley, for garnish (optional)
Canola oil for frying
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Directions
In a food processor fitted with blade, add the eggs and shrimp and pulse until chopped into a chunky mousse. Season with salt and pepper. Have soba noodles in a large bowl and pour mousse over noodles. Fold in parsley, yuzu and pancetta. Check flavor by cooking a small portion and season if necessary. Spread noodle pancake mixture in an even layer in a sauté pan over high heat coated with oil. Shallow fry pancakes until golden, brown and delicious, both sides, about 6 minutes. Cut into wedges and garnish with parsley.

Drink pairings
Sapporo Beer
—From Japan

A lager, quite refreshing with a moderately light body. Pairs very nicely with the Soba Noodle-Shrimp Pancakes.

Jean Luc Colombo Rose
—Provence, France
Taste:
Surprisingly complex, with intriguing notes of raspberry, cherry and black olive
Aroma: Subtle hints of peach, rose petals and pepper on the nose

Colombo is hailed as “the winemaking wizard of the Rhone” for introducing innovative methods in his vineyards and throughout the production process while making well-regarded, original wines. He believes good wine relies on 3 key elements: terroir, human endeavor and modern winemaking techniques.

—Enjoy on its own or with a wide range of appetizers, fish, poultry dishes and vegetarian fare. This wines pairs equally well with Michel Richard’s Beet Soba Bolognese and Ming’s Soba Noodle Carbonara.

—40% Syrah, 40% Mourvedre, 20% Counoise

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chef ming tsaiMing Tsai is the host and executive producer of public television series Simply Ming. Each week, Simply Ming brings mouthwatering recipes inspired by the combination of East and West into homes across the country.

The Daily Dish: Ma Po Tofu-Zucchini

ma po tofu plated

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Today I’m using two of the easiest east-west ingredients to work with—and they work really well together: Tofu and zucchini. I grew up eating tofu in stir fries and salads and discovered it truly is nature’s vegetarian meat. Zucchini requires very little prep and it’s almost as versatile as tofu. You’ll see what I mean in today’s recipe.

Serves 4

Ingredients
1 medium yellow onion, 1/4-inch dice
1 tablespoon minced ginger
1 large red jalapeno, minced
1 tablespoon sambal
1 bunch scallions sliced thinly, white and green separated
1 medium zucchini, 1/2-inch dice
2 packages silken tofu, 1/2-inch dice
1 pound dark meat ground chicken
1 tablespoon naturally brewed soy sauce
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
Canola oil to cook
House rice (brown/white rice combo)

Directions
In a hot wok coated with oil over high heat, stir-fry the chicken, season and cook through. Remove chicken to a plate. Add more oil and stir-fry the onion, ginger, jalapeno, sambal and scallion whites for 2 minutes. Add zucchini, season, and stir-fry for 2 minutes.

Add the tofu, gently stirring/flipping, taking care not to break up the pieces, then add chicken and naturally brewed soy sauce. Serve family style with house rice, garnish with scallion greens.

Drink pairing
Qupe Chardonnay 2006 “Bien Nacido – Y Block” Qupe Chardonnay

— from Santa Maria Valley, Santa Barbara County, California

Taste: From a cool vintage, therefore flavor is leaning more towards citrus and minerality. Feels firm in the mouth

Aroma: Honey and toasted oak with a slight bit of earthiness

—grapes are whole cluster pressed
—aged in French oak

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Ming Tsai is the host and executive producer of public television series Simply Ming. Each week, Simply Ming brings mouthwatering recipes inspired by the combination of East and West into homes across the country.

The Daily Dish: Creamy Risotto with Baby Shrimp and Bok Choy

By Ming Tsai of Simply Ming

Serves 4

Ingredients

1 tablespoon minced garlic
2 minced shallots
2 tablespoons minced lemongrass
2 cups koshi hikari or similar sushi rice (or Arborio rice)
1 cup white wine
2-3 cups chicken stock, hot
1 pound baby Contessa shrimp
3 heads baby bok choy, shredded
4 tablespoons room temperature cream cheese
Minced chives, for garnish
Olive oil to cook
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Directions

Coat a skillet over medium heat lightly with olive oil and saute the garlic, shallots, and lemongrass for about 2 minutes. Add the rice, stir to coat with oil and season. Deglaze with white wine and reduce by 75%. Slowly add stock a ladle at a time, stirring rice until each ladle of liquid is absorbed. When just beyond al dente, add the shrimp and bok choy to heat through. Add cream cheese to melt, check again for flavor and garnish with chives. Serve.
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Ming Tsai is the host and executive producer of public television series Simply Ming. Each week, Simply Ming brings mouthwatering recipes inspired by the combination of East and West into homes across the country.