The Daily Dish: Bloody Mary Scallop Ceviche

Bloody Mary Scallop Ceviche in martini glasses

If you’ve ever eaten at a Korean restaurant, you’ve probably tasted kochu jang, a chile bean paste that packs more flavor in its pinkie than most condiments.

Today I’m using it in my master pair with one of the West’s top sauces, Worcestershire, another flavor monster. Together, they’re a force to be reckoned with, as you’ll see in today’s recipe: My Bloody Mary Scallop Ceviche. It brings one of my top drinks and one of my favorite appetizers together.

It’s a nice red to go with your red, white, and blue Independence Day celebrations this weekend.

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Serves 4

Ingredients
2 cups V-8 or tomato juice
3 tablespoons kochu jang
2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
1/2 cup 1/4-inch-diced celery
1 shallot, minced
pinch celery salt
4 limes, 3 juiced, 1 reserved for garnish
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
1/2 pound fresh Bay scallops, foot removed, rinsed, drained (or use quartered sea scallops)

Directions
In a large bowl, combine V-8, kochu jang, Worcestershire sauce, celery, shallot, celery salt and lime juice. Check flavor and season, if necessary. Add scallops and stir to combine. Cover and place in fridge for 10 minutes. Serve in chilled martini glasses garnished with lime wedge.

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chef ming tsaiMing Tsai is the host and executive producer of public television series Simply Ming. Each week, Simply Ming brings mouthwatering recipes inspired by the combination of East and West into homes across the country.

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The Daily Dish: Spring-dug parsnips with seared sea scallops

Here’s a recipe for you when you are craving spring. It comes from my friend and celebrity chef Michel Nischan, who is a big advocate for healthy eating. For him, this time of year means spring-dug parsnips. The sweet root benefits from blanching and then roasting to bring out its over-wintered sweetness — and when it’s pureed, its texture is similar to very smooth apple butter.

Ingredients
1 large or two medium spring-dug parsnips, peeled (about 10 ounces)
Zest of 1 lemon
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice, about ½ lemon’s worth
1 to 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
2 packed tablespoons freshly chopped chervil
Kosher or sea salt
Freshly ground black pepper
2 tablespoons grapeseed oil
12 large dry sea scallops (about ¾ pound)
6 generous sprigs fresh chervil

Directions
Heat oven to 375 degrees.

In a large saucepan over medium heat, simmer parsnips in just enough water to cover; cook about 15 minutes. Let cool about 10 minutes. Remove parsnips from pan and discard all but ¼ cup of cooking liquid. Set aside. Slice parsnips into 1/2-inch-thick strips and lay on a lightly oiled, rimmed baking sheet. Bake 20 to 25 minutes, or until nicely browned; turn parsnips at least once for even browning.

Using a food processor, pulse together parsnips, lemon zest, and juice until parsnips break down. With the motor running, add reserved parsnip liquid 1 tablespoon at a time, until mixture resembles loose apple butter. Pulse in olive oil and chopped chervil. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Keep warm.

Heat a large, dry sauté pan over high heat. Brush each scallop on all sides with grapeseed oil and season with salt and pepper. Place scallops in hot pan and do not move them for 2 to 3 minutes, or until edges are well browned. Turn scallops over and cook for 1 to 2 minutes longer.

Place on a warm plate and let rest for 2 minutes—any juices that collect, stir into parsnip puree. Divide the parsnip puree onto 6 warmed appetizer plates. Set two scallops on top of parsnips and garnish with fresh chervil. Yield 6 servings

Adapted from Michel Nischan, The Dressing Room.

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Annie B. Copps is a senior editor at Yankee Magazine. Annie oversees the magazine’s food coverage, both as an editor and as a contributor of feature stories and columns.