The Daily Dish: Miso Butter Pork Udon Noodles

Miso Butter Pork Udon Noodles

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One of the most satisfying meals I’ve ever had was a big bowl of Japanese udon noodles topped with—are you ready for this—miso butter. Yes, a combination of Japan’s traditional miso paste blended with our own very western butter. It’s a rich, savory marriage made in heaven—or nirvana—and today I’m am going to show you how to make it.

So without further ado, Miso-Butter Pork Udon Noodles, an all-in-one noodle dish that enhances one of my favorite duos, pork and apples. Let’s get cooking.

Serves 4

Ingredients
3 shallots, minced
1 pound ground naturally fed pork
1 bunch scallions, thinly sliced, white and green separated
1/2 cup mirin
2 quarts chicken stock
1 apple, skin on, thinly sliced
4 tablespoons shiro miso
1 pound fresh ramen noodles, blanched
4 tablespoons unsalted butter
Canola oil
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Directions
In a stockpot coated lightly with oil over medium high heat, saute shallots and pork. When pork is cooked through, add scallion whites and deglaze with mirin. Add chicken stock. Add apples and check for flavor. When simmering, whisk in miso over a strainer and check for flavor. Add ramen noodles and heat through. To serve, divide noodles and broth amongst 4 soup bowls and top each serving with scallion greens and pat of butter. Serve immediately.

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chef ming tsaiMing Tsai is the host and executive producer of public television series Simply Ming. Each week, Simply Ming brings mouthwatering recipes inspired by the combination of East and West into homes across the country.

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The Daily Dish: Bloody Mary Scallop Ceviche

Bloody Mary Scallop Ceviche in martini glasses

If you’ve ever eaten at a Korean restaurant, you’ve probably tasted kochu jang, a chile bean paste that packs more flavor in its pinkie than most condiments.

Today I’m using it in my master pair with one of the West’s top sauces, Worcestershire, another flavor monster. Together, they’re a force to be reckoned with, as you’ll see in today’s recipe: My Bloody Mary Scallop Ceviche. It brings one of my top drinks and one of my favorite appetizers together.

It’s a nice red to go with your red, white, and blue Independence Day celebrations this weekend.

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Serves 4

Ingredients
2 cups V-8 or tomato juice
3 tablespoons kochu jang
2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
1/2 cup 1/4-inch-diced celery
1 shallot, minced
pinch celery salt
4 limes, 3 juiced, 1 reserved for garnish
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
1/2 pound fresh Bay scallops, foot removed, rinsed, drained (or use quartered sea scallops)

Directions
In a large bowl, combine V-8, kochu jang, Worcestershire sauce, celery, shallot, celery salt and lime juice. Check flavor and season, if necessary. Add scallops and stir to combine. Cover and place in fridge for 10 minutes. Serve in chilled martini glasses garnished with lime wedge.

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chef ming tsaiMing Tsai is the host and executive producer of public television series Simply Ming. Each week, Simply Ming brings mouthwatering recipes inspired by the combination of East and West into homes across the country.

The Daily Dish: Seared curried butterfish with warm olive chutney

You may have a hard time wrapping your brain around pairing madras curry and olives, but if you think about it a moment, it really works. The French regularly use many of the ingredients that are in curry with olives—you’ve probably tasted the combination and not even known it. But you’ll see for yourself how well these potent ingredients harmonize in my Seared curried butterfish with warm olive chutney.

Ingredients
2 tablespoons madras curry powder
1/4 cup rice flour
4 pieces butterfish or other fatty white fish
3 shallots minced
1/2 cup mixed olives, pitted, minced
1 large tomato, 1/4-inch dice
Juice of 1 orange
2 tablespoons chopped cilantro
Sea salt and freshly ground pepper
Canola oil for cooking

Directions
On a pie plate, combine the curry and rice flour. Season fish with salt and pepper. Dredge the fish fillets on both sides into the rice flour mixture. In a cast-iron pan over medium-high heat coated lightly with oil, sear the fish until golden, brown and delicious, about 8 minutes total. Remove fish and wipe out pan. In same pan coated lightly with oil, saute the shallots, then add olives, tomato and orange juice and heat through. Toss with cilantro and serve 1 heaping tablespoon over each fillet. Serve on banana leaf.

Serves 4

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chef ming tsaiMing Tsai is the host and executive producer of public television series Simply Ming. Each week, Simply Ming brings mouthwatering recipes inspired by the combination of East and West into homes across the country.

The Daily Dish: Sauteed fiddlehead ferns

This time of year is a transitional one for local ingredients, so we turned to Josh Ziskin, chef and owner of the Italian-inspired La Morra restaurant in Brookline. The end of winter through spring can be a challenging time to write a menu, so he sticks closely to what is locally available — and right now, that means fiddlehead ferns.

Total time: 30 minutes

Active time: 20 minutes

Ingredients
1 pound fiddlehead ferns, well rinsed and trimmed
3 tablespoons vegetable oil
4 shallots, thinly sliced
4 cloves garlic, minced
¼ cup white wine (optional)
1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme (or the fresh herb of your choice: rosemary, basil, or oregano)
2 tablespoon unsalted butter
Kosher or sea salt

Directions
Bring a large sauce pot of generously salted water to boil. Blanch fiddleheads for 4 minutes; remove to ice water for 1 minute. Strain from water and dry well.

In a large saute pan over medium-high add oil and cook shallots and garlic until shallots are translucent. Add fiddleheads and saute for 2 minutes. Add wine (if using) and reduce until about 1 tablespoon of liquid remains. Add about 2 tablespoons of water and generously season with salt and pepper. Add thyme and butter and stir well.

Recipe courtesy of Josh Ziskin of La Morra.
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Annie B. Copps is a senior editor at Yankee Magazine. Annie oversees the magazine’s food coverage, both as an editor and as a contributor of feature stories and columns.