The Daily Dish: Baked Figs with Shaoxing Sabayon

baked figs

listen icon Listen to the Daily Dish

One of the first things I had in France as a teenager was figs flambéed in orange liqueur. I realized that’s what they mean when they talk about “manna from heaven.” Since then I’ve combined figs with all kinds of spirits, but for one of the best, I reach to the East for Shaoxing wine.

This Chinese sherry-like wine is great for both sweet and savory cooking, and today we are going to take a trip on the sweet side with my Baked Figs with Shaoxing Sabayon, a warm dessert flavored with honey and candied ginger.

Serves 4

Ingredients
8 ripe, black mission figs, quartered
3 egg yolks
2 tablespoons Shaoxing wine
3 tablespoons honey
1 teaspoon minced candied ginger
1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice

Directions
Preheat broiler Place figs in oven-proof oval dishes. Over a bain marie, whisk yolks, Shaoxing wine, honey and ginger until thickened, taking care not to curdle eggs. Off the heat, whisk in lemon juice. Nap over figs and broil for about 1 minute, until lightly colored. Garnish with extra ginger and serve warm.

Ey Muscat de Rivesaltes
—Roussillon, France

Taste: Rich and velvety, with flavors of orange rind, lychee, peach and spice leading into a pleasantly bitter finish

Aroma: Aromatic and complex, recalling orange rind, fresh figs and apricot

This delicately sweet dessert wine is exceptional on its own or paired with fresh fruit desserts, pastries and custard. Lovely with the Baked Figs with Shaoxing Sabayon.

—100% Muscat d’Alexandrie

__________________________________________________________
chef ming tsaiMing Tsai is the host and executive producer of public television series Simply Ming.

Advertisements

The Daily Dish: Soba Noodle-Shrimp Pancakes

Soba Noodle-Shrimp Pancakes

listen icon Listen to the Daily Dish

You may think that pasta is only as flavorful as its sauce, but that would mean you haven’t tried Japanese soba noodles. Made of buckwheat, they have an earthy, nutty flavor that evokes the countryside, which is why I’ve paired them with an Italian ingredient that has the same effect, pancetta. And this east-west pair is going to be the platform for today’s all in one dish: my Soba Noodle Shrimp Pancakes.

Serves 4

Ingredients
2 eggs
1 pound shrimp
1/4 cup chopped parsley, plus some leaves for garnish
2 tablespoons yuzu or fresh lemon juice
1 cup diced, rendered pancetta, cooled
2 cups blanched soba noodles (leave a pinhole of rawness in center)
Chopped parsley, for garnish (optional)
Canola oil for frying
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Directions
In a food processor fitted with blade, add the eggs and shrimp and pulse until chopped into a chunky mousse. Season with salt and pepper. Have soba noodles in a large bowl and pour mousse over noodles. Fold in parsley, yuzu and pancetta. Check flavor by cooking a small portion and season if necessary. Spread noodle pancake mixture in an even layer in a sauté pan over high heat coated with oil. Shallow fry pancakes until golden, brown and delicious, both sides, about 6 minutes. Cut into wedges and garnish with parsley.

Drink pairings
Sapporo Beer
—From Japan

A lager, quite refreshing with a moderately light body. Pairs very nicely with the Soba Noodle-Shrimp Pancakes.

Jean Luc Colombo Rose
—Provence, France
Taste:
Surprisingly complex, with intriguing notes of raspberry, cherry and black olive
Aroma: Subtle hints of peach, rose petals and pepper on the nose

Colombo is hailed as “the winemaking wizard of the Rhone” for introducing innovative methods in his vineyards and throughout the production process while making well-regarded, original wines. He believes good wine relies on 3 key elements: terroir, human endeavor and modern winemaking techniques.

—Enjoy on its own or with a wide range of appetizers, fish, poultry dishes and vegetarian fare. This wines pairs equally well with Michel Richard’s Beet Soba Bolognese and Ming’s Soba Noodle Carbonara.

—40% Syrah, 40% Mourvedre, 20% Counoise

__________________________________________________________
chef ming tsaiMing Tsai is the host and executive producer of public television series Simply Ming. Each week, Simply Ming brings mouthwatering recipes inspired by the combination of East and West into homes across the country.

The Daily Dish: Creamy Risotto with Baby Shrimp and Bok Choy

By Ming Tsai of Simply Ming

Serves 4

Ingredients

1 tablespoon minced garlic
2 minced shallots
2 tablespoons minced lemongrass
2 cups koshi hikari or similar sushi rice (or Arborio rice)
1 cup white wine
2-3 cups chicken stock, hot
1 pound baby Contessa shrimp
3 heads baby bok choy, shredded
4 tablespoons room temperature cream cheese
Minced chives, for garnish
Olive oil to cook
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Directions

Coat a skillet over medium heat lightly with olive oil and saute the garlic, shallots, and lemongrass for about 2 minutes. Add the rice, stir to coat with oil and season. Deglaze with white wine and reduce by 75%. Slowly add stock a ladle at a time, stirring rice until each ladle of liquid is absorbed. When just beyond al dente, add the shrimp and bok choy to heat through. Add cream cheese to melt, check again for flavor and garnish with chives. Serve.
___________________________________________________________
Ming Tsai is the host and executive producer of public television series Simply Ming. Each week, Simply Ming brings mouthwatering recipes inspired by the combination of East and West into homes across the country.

The Daily Dish: Miso-Parsley Poached Sole

listen icon Listen to the Daily Dish

As many cooks know, dashi is the fundamental Japanese stock. Easily made from a few simple ingredients, it’s the basis of miso soup and an integral part of dishes including sukiyaki and shabu shabu. It is a very versatile ingredient and one that Western cooks really ought to use… and today we will use it in my Miso Parsley Poached Sole.

Serves 4

Ingredients
4 cups dashi, heating in pan
2 tablespoons shiro miso
2 bunches flat leaf parsley, picked, save 1 tablespoon freshly chopped leaves
3 tablespoons butter
4 sole fillets, Dover or grey, deboned by cutting a “v” in center of fillet
1 tablespoon yuzu juice
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

Ingredients
In a low, wide saucepot, combine dashi and heat over medium-high. Whisk in miso using a strainer and discard granules left in strainer. Add the parsley and butter. Transfer mixture to a heat-proof pitcher and buzz with a handblender. Check seasoning. Add back to saucepot, bring to a simmer and add fish. Cover and turn heat off. Let sit for 5 minutes. Serve in soup plates, garnished with poaching broth and fresh chopped parsley mixed with yuzu juice.

Wine pairing:
Pride of the Village Sake

Junmai Ginjo. An elegant, super-premium sake from a brewery with an 850-year history. The brewery is considered to be Japan’s oldest surviving sake brewer.

Taste: A refined and clear flavor, yet settled and deep. Semi-dry with a superbly clean finish — A fantastic pairing with the Miso-Parsley Poached Sole.

Aroma: A pleasingly light and fruity nose, laced wth violets, strawberries, pear and grape.

__________________________________________________________
chef ming tsai Ming Tsai is the host and executive producer of public television series Simply Ming. Each week, Simply Ming brings mouthwatering recipes inspired by the combination of East and West into homes across the country.

The Daily Dish: Sweet and Sour Chicken and Peppers

plated Sweet and Sour Chicken and Peppers

listen icon Listen to the Daily Dish
One of the great things about the food of other cultures is that it’s full of surprise flavors — like tamarind, which is the source of the unique tartness in so many Thai dishes. Tamarind takes tart to a new level, and to balance its complex flavor, there’s nothing better than the deep sweetness of brown sugar. So today, East meets West and sweet meets tart in Sweet and Sour Chicken and Peppers, a super-easy wok stir-fry that gives you an all-in-one meal.

Ingredients
3/4 cup tamarind puree
3/4 cup brown sugar
2 tablespoons naturally brewed soy sauce
1 tablespoon minced ginger
1 1/2 pounds dark chicken meat, skin removed, 1-inch dice
1 large yellow onion, 1 inch dice
1 red bell pepper, 1 inch dice
1 yellow bell pepper, 1 inch dice
House rice (white/brown rice combo)
Canola oil to cook
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Directions
In a bowl, combine tamarind, sugar, naturally brewed soy sauce and ginger; add chicken and marinate for 20 minutes.

In a hot wok coated lightly with oil, stir fry the onion and ginger. Add the chicken with a slotted spoon, reserving marinade. Cook until almost cooked through, about 4 minutes, and add peppers and rest of marinade. Bring to a simmer and check for flavor. Serve on house rice.

Drink pairings
New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc
Goslings Bermuda Rum
__________________________________________________________
chef ming tsai Ming Tsai is the host and executive producer of public television series Simply Ming. Each week, Simply Ming brings mouthwatering recipes inspired by the combination of East and West into homes across the country.

The Daily Dish: Spicy Wok Clams and Leeks

plated Spicy Wok Clams and Leeks

listen icon Listen to the Daily Dish

When I come across a flavor I really love, I like to spread it around, and the best way to spread the great flavor of Indonesia’s spicy sambal is with crème fraiche, the French multitasker that also mellows sambal’s heat — which you will see in todays’ recipe: Spicy Wok Clams and Leeks, an all-in-one seafood dish with a nuance of bacon and garlic.

Serves 4

Ingredients
2 slices of bacon, finely diced
4 cloves of garlic, sliced
2 large leeks, white parts only, julienned, washed, rinsed, spun dry
1 tablespoon sambal
2 pounds small clams or cockles, purged in corn meal/water solution
1 cup white wine
1/4 cup crème fraiche
Canola oil
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
Crusty multi grain or whole wheat bread

Directions
In a wok over medium-high heat very lightly coated with oil, render the bacon. Pour off almost all the bacon fat and add garlic and leeks, saute until softened and season with salt and pepper. Add sambal and clams and deglaze with wine and cover. Cook until clams open, about 6-8 minutes. Add crème fraiche and stir into liquid. Serve with crusty bread in large bowls.

Drink Pairing
Hopler Gewurztraminer 2003
Creamy on the palate with a long finish, this is a particularly great pairing with spicy Asian foods and seafood.
__________________________________________________________
chef ming tsai Ming Tsai is the host and executive producer of public television series Simply Ming. Each week, Simply Ming brings mouthwatering recipes inspired by the combination of East and West into homes across the country.

The Daily Dish: Asian Pistou Dumplings in Lime Broth

a bowl of asian pistou with lime

listen icon Listen to the Daily Dish

Some of China’s smallest treasures are also its tastiest — dim sum — those savory little dumplings filled with meat, seafood, and vegetables. And they translate well to Western cuisine because they make great hors d’oeuvres. Today, however, we serve up a vegetarian soup version in my Asian Pistou Dumplings in Lime Broth. Let’s get cooking.

Yields 10 dumplings

Ingredients
1 bunch scallions, sliced thinly, white and green separated
4 cups vegetarian broth
Juice of 2 limes
1 tablespoon Wanjashan low-sodium tamari
1/2 cup packed parsley
1/2 cup packed Thai basil
4 cloves garlic
1/2 cup edamame
4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
10-12 thin wonton wrappers
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Directions
In a saucepot coated lightly with extra virgin olive oil, sweat the scallion whites and add broth. Reduce by 25%. Season and add lime juice and tamari. Meanwhile, using mortar and pestle, blend with a pinch of salt the parsley, basil, and garlic.

Fold in edamame and extra virgin olive oil and check for seasoning. Alternatively, using a food processor, pulse together salt, parsley, basil and garlic. Remove mixture to a bowl and fold in edamame and whisk in olive oil.

Make wontons with Asian pistou filling. Boil in broth and serve.

Garnish with scallions greens.

__________________________________________________________
chef ming tsai Ming Tsai is the host and executive producer of public television series Simply Ming. Each week, Simply Ming brings mouthwatering recipes inspired by the combination of East and West into homes across the country.